Wednesday Nov 06, 2002

Kafka and I

In “The Metamorphosis,” Franz Kafka shocked readers with a grotesque fable about a man who wakes up one morning to discover he has been transformed into an insect, which dovetails with the Buddhist world view of rebirth, or transmigration of the soul. Is this possible? When asked about reincarnation, the French wit and philosopher, Voltaire, replied that it is just as remarkable to have been born once, as to have been born twice. Nightmarish at first glance, Kafka’s born again parable is about waking up, to become self-aware and see yourself as you are without illusion and the dulling veneer of ingrained social conditioning imposed by the establishment.

Instead of Kafka’s rude awakening, consider another scenario. Imagine your eyes open one morning to an awesome realization. Somehow, while you were sleeping, you acquired a gift, a direct and continuous feed, from the Cosmic Mind. Envision the nature of your miracle. See it as a complete, penetrating, and organic knowing.

What would your dream be? Play the violin as a virtuoso; sing opera as a diva; compose with the genius verve of Mozart; or create art with the inner necessity, comprehension, and feeling that fueled Gauguin, Van Gogh, Kandinsky, Modigliani, Picasso, and other artists of their caliber, known and unknown. You have been given a gift and there is apparently no rational explanation for how it got there.

How would you react? Your fantastic encounter with the divine adamantly nudges you to reevaluate your own preconceived thoughts and beliefs. Would other people understand? Would you understand? People would certainly use their yardsticks to measure your far out experience, which was light years beyond any conventional sphere of learning. In a world desensitized by and insatiable for hype, it would be easier for others to accept that aliens had abducted you.

The truth is not out there; it is inside you.»

Note: If you would like to read the full story, see Kafka and I inside the main site gallery.

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